June, 2007

Tolerance in the Workplace

On The Job

I receive some really great letters from readers and always appreciate their viewpoints, even if they don't agree with what I've written. Many readers take the time to outline a particular problem at work, and ask me for help in dealing with it. But sometimes I receive letters that are full of anger and resentment -- and intolerance. These writers blame a certain person for their trouble -- but also the person's gender or the ethnic or religious group to which the person belongs.

2007 100

What's in a Name?

On The Job

Penelope Trunk, who was kind enough to blog about my new book, “45 Things You Do That Drive Your Boss Crazy…and How to Avoid Them,” pointed out that while she liked the book, she wondered about the name Bruzzese. What’s up with her name?” Trunk wondered. Who has any idea how to pronounce it?” ( [link] ) “If you want people to talk about the stuff you do, you need a name people can say,” Trunk wrote. First, let me say that Bruzzese is Italian.

2007 100

Blogging About Work

On The Job

The subject of free speech has been a theme of several columns I’ve been writing these days. As a journalist, I’m a big proponent of the First Amendment, and bristle whenever anyone tries to tell me what I can and cannot write. I maintain that information in power, and people deserve to know the facts and then make up their own minds about what to do with those facts.

2007 100

Making a Bad First Impression

On The Job

There's no better feeling than coming out of a job interview and feeling like you nailed it. You and the interviewer clicked, everyone seemed very impressed with your resume and abilities, and there was plenty of positive body language. On the other hand, there is no worse feeling than knowing that you messed up -- that somewhere in the interview you really bombed and possibly blew your chances of getting a job you really want.

2007 100

Choosing a Career

On The Job

When I was a kid, I don’t remember anyone asking me what I wanted to be when I grew up. A career was just not something I contemplated at an early age. When I played Barbies with my best friend in first grade, my Barbie was always named “Beth” and she either worked as a florist or in a Woolworth’s. This was the extent of my career knowledge – my grandfather owned a nursery and my mother and grandmother took me to Woolworth’s every Saturday. As I got older, I used to talk about being a teacher.

2007 100